Work Made For Hire

Creative Business Advice for Creative people

Posts tagged Freelance

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humansofnewyork:

"I want to be a fashion designer, but I work in visual merchandising to pay the bills. I get off late almost every night— a lot of times it’s after 9 PM. So it’s hard to find the energy to be creative. I should be sketching new pieces or sewing every night, but I’m too tired. Then the weekend comes around, and all I want to do is relax and decompress from the week. But those are the only two days I have to work on my dream."
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2 DAYS LEFT: http://amzn.to/10sbtW5

To all my fellow job jugglers and dream chasers: keep on keepin’ on.

humansofnewyork:

"I want to be a fashion designer, but I work in visual merchandising to pay the bills. I get off late almost every night— a lot of times it’s after 9 PM. So it’s hard to find the energy to be creative. I should be sketching new pieces or sewing every night, but I’m too tired. Then the weekend comes around, and all I want to do is relax and decompress from the week. But those are the only two days I have to work on my dream."

—————————-

2 DAYS LEFT: http://amzn.to/10sbtW5

To all my fellow job jugglers and dream chasers: keep on keepin’ on.

Filed under freelance dayjob creativity HONY

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Don’t be the Agent of Your Own Destruction
You can’t control a number of things in a negotiation. You can’t control if a negotiation will happen. You can’t control what the other side will want from you. And you can’t control how you’ll feel about a negotiation.
But there is a lot you can control and influence in the negotiation.
If you only focus on what you can’t control you will have frustrating negotiations with less than stellar results. And that will partially be your fault.
Don’t be the agent of your own destruction.
Read the rest of the post on the blog!
Featured image by Ahd Photography via Flickr.com

Don’t be the Agent of Your Own Destruction

You can’t control a number of things in a negotiation. You can’t control if a negotiation will happen. You can’t control what the other side will want from you. And you can’t control how you’ll feel about a negotiation.

But there is a lot you can control and influence in the negotiation.

If you only focus on what you can’t control you will have frustrating negotiations with less than stellar results. And that will partially be your fault.

Don’t be the agent of your own destruction.

Read the rest of the post on the blog!

Featured image by Ahd Photography via Flickr.com

Filed under freelance negotiation

0 notes

Power Play
People waste a ridiculous amount of time worrying about power in negotiations.
They worry about having it, or getting it or stopping others from taking it. They invest precious time trying to figure out how best to prove their power, like where to sit in the room or who gets to talk first.
The problem with wasting your time like this is that you put other people in charge of whether you are powerful. By worrying about power you actually make yourself less powerful.
Read the rest of the post on the blog!
Featured image by YardSale via Flickr.com.

Power Play

People waste a ridiculous amount of time worrying about power in negotiations.

They worry about having it, or getting it or stopping others from taking it. They invest precious time trying to figure out how best to prove their power, like where to sit in the room or who gets to talk first.

The problem with wasting your time like this is that you put other people in charge of whether you are powerful. By worrying about power you actually make yourself less powerful.

Read the rest of the post on the blog!

Featured image by YardSale via Flickr.com.

Filed under freelance negotiation

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How to Ask a Freelancer to Work For Free
Dear Person With a Great Idea/Product/Opportunity and Little and/or No Money,
Welcome to the blog! I understand that you’re in search of some high quality work  from a freelancer but don’t have a lot of cash on hand.
You may have found this site by Googling “Getting freelancers to work for free” or someone you’ve approached for work may have sent you to this post in reply or it’s 2am and you’re on Tumblr. No matter which it is, I’m glad you’re here!
I’m going to tell you the secret of how to ask a freelancer to do high quality work for you for free.
Find out the answer by reading the post on the blog.
Photo by Keith Bloomfield via Flickr.com.

How to Ask a Freelancer to Work For Free

Dear Person With a Great Idea/Product/Opportunity and Little and/or No Money,

Welcome to the blog! I understand that you’re in search of some high quality work  from a freelancer but don’t have a lot of cash on hand.

You may have found this site by Googling “Getting freelancers to work for free” or someone you’ve approached for work may have sent you to this post in reply or it’s 2am and you’re on Tumblr. No matter which it is, I’m glad you’re here!

I’m going to tell you the secret of how to ask a freelancer to do high quality work for you for free.

Find out the answer by reading the post on the blog.

Photo by Keith Bloomfield via Flickr.com.

Filed under freelance freelancing don't work for free

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The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions: Helper Questions
Alright freelancers! Let’s kick some butt and take some names, shall we? The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions continues with questions that can help you win friends and influence people.Up until now we’ve mostly been talking about questions that freelancers can ask to take charge; this week’s question is a bit different.
This week we’re going to talk about Helper Questions: questions which can help you make your case.
Read the rest of this week’s post over on the blog!
Photo by Roadsidepictures via Flickr.com.

The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions: Helper Questions

Alright freelancers! Let’s kick some butt and take some names, shall we? The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions continues with questions that can help you win friends and influence people.

Up until now we’ve mostly been talking about questions that freelancers can ask to take charge; this week’s question is a bit different.

This week we’re going to talk about Helper Questions: questions which can help you make your case.

Read the rest of this week’s post over on the blog!

Photo by Roadsidepictures via Flickr.com.

Filed under Ace Freelancer negotiation freelance independent artists Questions Katie Lane Work Made For Hire

22 notes

jessicafurseth:

Freelancing tools.
I’ve just discovered Coffitivity: a website that exists in this world solely to play coffee house sounds for freelancers to play while working at home. It has something to do with the ultimate level of background noise to aid concentration, apparently - I don’t know anything about that, but I know it’s wonderful.
Here are some other tools that make freelancing life better, most of them completely free. Yes, technology is amazing.
Feedly. Following the demise of Google Reader, Feedly has stepped up and filled its considerable shoes. The default look is a magazine view, but with some quick adjustments, Feedly will deliver news to media junkies in the Reader format we know and love.
Gmail; Google Drive. Say what you will about Google and their targeted ads, but those people run a hell of a spam filter. I’ve also been using Google Drive’s writing software to write and store all my articles since getting the MacBook Air last year, an 11-inch darling that does everything and weighs about as much as a paperback. On the subject of storage, Dropbox is great for sending big files such as images to editors.
Twitter. In addition to the chat and general good vibrations, you could theoretically stop reading the papers altogether as the biggest stories of the day inevitably float to the surface on Twitter. Regarding networks, I’ve also found LinkedIn to be surprisingly useful, as it shows who’s in charge of what at publications, as well as who can put you in touch with people you want to speak to.
Tumblr; Wordpress. I like Tumblr for personal blogging as it’s extremely easy to use, along with the dashboard adding a community aspect. It doesn’t show up as reliably on web searches though, which is why Wordpress is better for portfolios. It’s a bit trickier to work out at first, but provides much more design control.
I use a dictaphone to record interviews, including off the speakerphone or Skype, but there are apps for that so I’ll probably cut down a gadget eventually. The ensuing transcribing, the most hated task, can be outsourced for pennies to Elance - a dirty little secret.
Evernote. I love the Evernote web clipper, which lets you save web pages in dedicated folders - great for article research. You can also add text documents, photos (included snaps of handwritten notes) and other file formats to the folder. For the first time, the office is truly paperless.

Big ups for Coffitivity! I found it the other day and love it. If you prefer white noise, I think Simply Noise is great; you can mix the noise to your preference.
I’ve also been playing with WorkFlowy recently and have found that it helps breaking down those large tasks that I avoid because I think they’re too complicated.

jessicafurseth:

Freelancing tools.

I’ve just discovered Coffitivity: a website that exists in this world solely to play coffee house sounds for freelancers to play while working at home. It has something to do with the ultimate level of background noise to aid concentration, apparently - I don’t know anything about that, but I know it’s wonderful.

Here are some other tools that make freelancing life better, most of them completely free. Yes, technology is amazing.

  • Feedly. Following the demise of Google Reader, Feedly has stepped up and filled its considerable shoes. The default look is a magazine view, but with some quick adjustments, Feedly will deliver news to media junkies in the Reader format we know and love.
  • Gmail; Google Drive. Say what you will about Google and their targeted ads, but those people run a hell of a spam filter. I’ve also been using Google Drive’s writing software to write and store all my articles since getting the MacBook Air last year, an 11-inch darling that does everything and weighs about as much as a paperback. On the subject of storage, Dropbox is great for sending big files such as images to editors.
  • Twitter. In addition to the chat and general good vibrations, you could theoretically stop reading the papers altogether as the biggest stories of the day inevitably float to the surface on Twitter. Regarding networks, I’ve also found LinkedIn to be surprisingly useful, as it shows who’s in charge of what at publications, as well as who can put you in touch with people you want to speak to.
  • Tumblr; Wordpress. I like Tumblr for personal blogging as it’s extremely easy to use, along with the dashboard adding a community aspect. It doesn’t show up as reliably on web searches though, which is why Wordpress is better for portfolios. It’s a bit trickier to work out at first, but provides much more design control.
  • I use a dictaphone to record interviews, including off the speakerphone or Skype, but there are apps for that so I’ll probably cut down a gadget eventually. The ensuing transcribing, the most hated task, can be outsourced for pennies to Elance - a dirty little secret.
  • Evernote. I love the Evernote web clipper, which lets you save web pages in dedicated folders - great for article research. You can also add text documents, photos (included snaps of handwritten notes) and other file formats to the folder. For the first time, the office is truly paperless.

Big ups for Coffitivity! I found it the other day and love it. If you prefer white noise, I think Simply Noise is great; you can mix the noise to your preference.

I’ve also been playing with WorkFlowy recently and have found that it helps breaking down those large tasks that I avoid because I think they’re too complicated.

(via chrysaliseditorial)

Filed under freelancing freelance productivity work tools

1 note

The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions: Discovery Questions
If you’ve ever had trouble getting much needed information from your clients, this week’s installment of the Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions is for you!
In the first installment of The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions I talked about the value of using questions to guide your clients or collaborators in directions that are beneficial to you.
This week I want to talk about the importance of using Discovery Questions.
Discovery questions are questions designed to gather information that is important to your work but that might not be readily offered. Or worse, is intentionally withheld.
Read the rest of this week’s post on the blog!
Photo by andercismo via Flickr.com

The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions: Discovery Questions

If you’ve ever had trouble getting much needed information from your clients, this week’s installment of the Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions is for you!

In the first installment of The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions I talked about the value of using questions to guide your clients or collaborators in directions that are beneficial to you.

This week I want to talk about the importance of using Discovery Questions.

Discovery questions are questions designed to gather information that is important to your work but that might not be readily offered. Or worse, is intentionally withheld.

Read the rest of this week’s post on the blog!

Photo by andercismo via Flickr.com

Filed under freelancing Ace Freelancer freelance Clients Katie Lane work made for hire

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The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions: Babysitting Questions
Questions are some of the easiest, cheapest, and most time-efficient tools you can use to get better results from your negotiations.
But people don’t use them.
When I ask freelancers why they avoid asking questions in their negotiations, I get one of two responses: they don’t know how to ask questions effectively, or they worry they’ll come off as rude if they ask too many or the “wrong kind” of questions.
Let’s fix that!
Read this week’s post on the blog!
Photo by mousiekm via Flickr.com

The Ace Freelancer’s Guide to Asking Questions: Babysitting Questions

Questions are some of the easiest, cheapest, and most time-efficient tools you can use to get better results from your negotiations.

But people don’t use them.

When I ask freelancers why they avoid asking questions in their negotiations, I get one of two responses: they don’t know how to ask questions effectively, or they worry they’ll come off as rude if they ask too many or the “wrong kind” of questions.

Let’s fix that!

Read this week’s post on the blog!

Photo by mousiekm via Flickr.com

Filed under freelance negotiation questions Ace Freelancer Katie Lane work made for hire